Category Archives: FISA

A Review of “The Future of Foreign Intelligence: Privacy and Surveillance in a Digital Age” by Laura K. Donohue

Joel Brenner presents his critique of Professor Laura Donohue’s The Future of Foreign Intelligence, and its “full-throated denunciation of the entire legal framework regulating the government’s collection of data about American citizens and permanent residents.” He discusses her findings in detail, and in the end, finds that they both agree on a number of specific proposals, and “disagree profoundly on FISA’s rationale and constitutional limitations.”

A Review of “The Future of Foreign Intelligence: Privacy and Surveillance in a Digital Age” by Laura K. Donohue

Trends & Predictions in Foreign Intelligence Surveillance: The FAA & Beyond

David Kris examines recent developments in foreign intelligence surveillance, including the impact of the Snowden leaks and the rise of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant on public and political attitudes towards electronic surveillance. In light of these developments, Kris presents several issues that he expects will surface as the 2017 expiration date of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) Amendments Act (FAA) draws near. He also addresses the longer-term impacts that other political and technological developments will have on foreign surveillance.

Sentencing Considerations & Their Implications on Foreign Policy

At JNSLP’s Feb. 11, 2015 symposium on “Trials and Terrorism: The Implications of Trying National Security Cases in Article III Courts,” an expert panel was convened to discuss trends in sentencing considerations in Article III terrorism prosecutions, and what the implications for these cases portend for american foreign policy. The panel consisted of a judge, a government official and former prosecutor, academics,  and sentencing experts. 

Symposium Introduction: Swimming in the Ocean of Big Data

This article introduces the topics to be discussed in the latest issue of JNSLP. The author argues that although readers will walk away with a greater understanding of “Big Data” generally, there still remains a need for a greater structural understanding of the subject in order to harness its power and direct its applications for the benefit of national security and the protection of civil liberties.

Charting the Future: What to Expect from Big Data

This article is modeled on a panel discussion at the symposium regarding two hypothetical case studies:  the first about detection technologies related to facial recognition and Terahertz detection and the second about passenger name recognition information created by airlines to manage travel reservations.  Through this conversation, the panelists discuss the relationship of big data collection to Fourth Amendment jurisprudence, the implications of changing technology on the future of big data collections, and the privacy concerns associated with the increased use of these types of surveillance methods as related to law enforcement.