Category Archives: Vol. 8 No. 3

Cyberlaw | Vol. 8 No. 3 examines multiple facets of cyberlaw, including human rights in cyberspace, cyberwar, international law and cyberespionage, cyber surveillance, and more.

Law Enforcement Access to Data Across Borders: The Evolving Security & Rights Issues

Jennifer Daskal describes the challenges facing law enforcement access to data across borders and examines the legal and political issues at stake in formulating clear standards for cross-border access to data. Daskal also presents possible mechanisms for establishing a framework for law enforcement access to content and non-content data in foreign jurisdictions.

10 Standards for Oversight & Transparency of National Intelligence Services

Authors Sarah Eskens, Ott van Daalen, and Nico van Eijk present a set of 10 standards for oversight and transparency for surveillance by intelligence services. The authors approach these recommendations from the viewpoint of the European Convention on Human Rights and the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, and illustrate their implementation using cases from the Court of Justice of the European Union and the European Court of Human Rights.

The 2014 Sony Hack and the Role of International Law

In this article, Clare Sullivan posits that the 2014 hack of Sony Pictures Entertainment (“Sony Hack”) heralds the arrival of a new form of modern warfare. She argues that the current state of international law is inadequate to deal with hacks like this one, which do not cause physical damage but which nonetheless result in serious economic harm and violations of privacy. In the author’s view, a new approach is needed to ensure that countries are permitted under international law to respond to and take countermeasures against such hacks.

How Technology Enhances the Right to Privacy: A Case Study on the Right to Hide Project of the Hungarian Civil Liberties Union

In this article, authors Fanny Hidvegi and Rita Zagoni describe the legal and political circumstances that prompted the Hungarian Civil Liberties Union to establish the “Right to Hide” (right to privacy) project for the promotion of privacy-enhancing technologies, and they discuss how the project can assist individuals in Hungary in securing their privacy.

Deterring Financially Motivated Cybercrime

In “Deterring Financially Motivated Cybercrime,” Zachary K. Goldman and Damon McCoy present three strategies for deterring attacks that use malicious cyber capabilities to generate a profit. Each strategy—the imposition of financial sanctions, public/private partnerships to disrupt tools of cybercrime, and activities to disrupt payment networks run by criminals who sell fraudulent goods over the Internet—is analyzed for strengths and weaknesses. The authors conclude with a discussion of the ways in which regulatory tools to combat cybercrime can overcome problems with formulating a cohesive deterrent strategy such as secrecy and attribution.