Tag Archives: Counterterrorism Law

The Wasp’s Nest: Intelligence Community Whistleblowing & Source Protection

Meyer and Berenbaum analyze the national security policy challenge in balancing protections for Intelligence Community whistleblowers and the government’s legitimate need for secrecy in order to execute the federal intelligence and counterintelligence mission. It is that need for secrecy that creates the intellectual distance between the sovereign’s requirement for information regarding the performance of the federal intelligence and counterintelligence mission and the ability to conduct that mission.

“On Target”: Precision & Balance in the Contemporary Law of Targeting

Schmitt and Widmar explore the law of targeting within international humanitarian law (IHL) and its application to international and non-international armed conflict. The article examines the “five elements” of a target operation, including the target, the weapon used, the execution of the attack, possible collateral damage and incidental injury, and location of the strike. The authors suggest that a better understanding of these norms can help international lawyers, policymakers, and operators avoid violations of international law by creating appropriate and well-known boundaries for targeting operations.

Symposium Introduction: Swimming in the Ocean of Big Data

This article introduces the topics to be discussed in the latest issue of JNSLP. The author argues that although readers will walk away with a greater understanding of “Big Data” generally, there still remains a need for a greater structural understanding of the subject in order to harness its power and direct its applications for the benefit of national security and the protection of civil liberties.