Tag Archives: Big Data

Before Privacy, Power: The Structural Constitution & the Challenge of Mass Surveillance

The rich legal literature that has grown up to assess the constitutionality of bulk communications collection by the government has focused overwhelmingly—and understandably—on the challenge such programs pose to particular claims of individual right against the state, yet attempting to describe what seems troubling about bulk collection in terms of individual rights alone has significant doctrinal and conceptual limits.

Law Enforcement Access to Data Across Borders: The Evolving Security & Rights Issues

Jennifer Daskal describes the challenges facing law enforcement access to data across borders and examines the legal and political issues at stake in formulating clear standards for cross-border access to data. Daskal also presents possible mechanisms for establishing a framework for law enforcement access to content and non-content data in foreign jurisdictions.

How Technology Enhances the Right to Privacy: A Case Study on the Right to Hide Project of the Hungarian Civil Liberties Union

In this article, authors Fanny Hidvegi and Rita Zagoni describe the legal and political circumstances that prompted the Hungarian Civil Liberties Union to establish the “Right to Hide” (right to privacy) project for the promotion of privacy-enhancing technologies, and they discuss how the project can assist individuals in Hungary in securing their privacy.