nationalsecuritylaw upcoming event: “Cutting Through the Fog of Law: Was Killing bin Laden an Illegal ‘Extrajudicial Execution,’ a ‘War Crime,’ or a Lawful Act During Armed Conflict? (Tuesday, June 28, 2011, Noon-2:00PM)

* upcoming event: "Cutting Through the Fog of Law: Was Killing bin Laden an Illegal ‘Extrajudicial Execution,’ a ‘War Crime,’ or a Lawful Act During Armed Conflict? (Tuesday, June 28, 2011, Noon-2:00PM)

Luncheon panel at the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies (Arlington, VA), from 12-2 on Tuesday the 28th (this week). An announcement containing more details is attached.

This event is co-sponsored by the Center for National Security Law and several other organizations and will feature contributors to the new CNSL volume, Legal Issues in the Struggle Against Terror. Copies of the book will be available for sale after the program concludes.

There is no charge for the program, but reservations are required. For further information and registration, please contact Patrick Cheetham, Research Coordinator of the International Center for Terrorism Studies, at (703) 562-4522 or icts.

John Norton Moore
Director, Center for National Security Law

Fog of War Program (June 28 2011) (2).pdf

Author/s

Author Profile

Robert M. Chesney is Charles I. Francis Professor in Law at UT-Austin School of Law. Chesney is a national security law specialist, with a particular interest in problems associated with terrorism. Professor Chesney recently served in the Justice Department in connection with the Detainee Policy Task Force created by Executive Order 13493. He is a member of the Advisory Committee of the American Bar Association's Standing Committee on Law and National Security, a senior editor for the Journal of National Security Law & Policy, an associate member of the Intelligence Science Board, a non-resident senior fellow of the Brookings Institution, a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and a member of the American Law Institute. Professor Chesney has published extensively on topics ranging from detention and prosecution in the counterterrorism context to the states secrets privilege. He served previously as chair of the Section on National Security Law of the Association of American Law Schools and as editor of the National Security Law Report (published by the American Bar Association's Standing Committee on Law and National Security). His upcoming projects include two books under contract with Oxford University Press, one concerning the evolution of detention law and policy and the other examining the judicial role in national security affairs.
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