upcoming events – IHL at Berkeley (April 9-10)

* West Coast International Humanitarian Law Teaching Workshop, sponsored by the ICRC and Berkeley Law (April 9-10, at Berkeley)

For those who are interested in developing an IHL course, or refining one they already teach, this is going to be a terrific event. Indeed, it should be really interesting even if one does not plan to teach an IHL-oriented course (note that one session talks about ways to integrate IHL into other courses). See the attached flyer and agenda for details.

[Note that this is a different event from the upcoming “national security law scholarly workshop/IHL training” event taking place in Austin on April 1st and 2nd. Details as to the Austin event will circulate later today.]

Flyer.doc

Agenda.doc

Lead Author

Robert M. Chesney
Robert M. Chesney is Charles I. Francis Professor in Law at UT-Austin School of Law. Chesney is a national security law specialist, with a particular interest in problems associated with terrorism. Professor Chesney recently served in the Justice Department in connection with the Detainee Policy Task Force created by Executive Order 13493. He is a member of the Advisory Committee of the American Bar Association's Standing Committee on Law and National Security, a senior editor for the Journal of National Security Law & Policy, an associate member of the Intelligence Science Board, a non-resident senior fellow of the Brookings Institution, a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and a member of the American Law Institute. Professor Chesney has published extensively on topics ranging from detention and prosecution in the counterterrorism context to the states secrets privilege. He served previously as chair of the Section on National Security Law of the Association of American Law Schools and as editor of the National Security Law Report (published by the American Bar Association's Standing Committee on Law and National Security). His upcoming projects include two books under contract with Oxford University Press, one concerning the evolution of detention law and policy and the other examining the judicial role in national security affairs.
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