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No Place in the Military: The Judiciary’s Failure to Compensate Victims of Military Sexual Assault & a Suggested Path Forward Using Lessons from the Prison Context

No Place in the Military: The Judiciary’s Failure to Compensate Victims of Military Sexual Assault & a Suggested Path Forward Using Lessons from the Prison Context

Patrie conducts a careful and detailed examination of sexual assault in the military with a review of several recent high-profile cases. She proposes a framework to enforce judicial noninterference in sensitive military affairs while also ensuring that the military does not violate servicemembers’ constitutional rights

“Friend of Humans”: An Argument for Developing Autonomous Weapons Systems

“Friend of Humans”: An Argument for Developing Autonomous Weapons Systems

Toscano reviews the state of autonomous robotic technology on the modern battlefield, in both its current and anticipated instances. He suggests that existing legal frameworks in international humanitarian law and the laws of war are equipped to deal with this novel form of weaponry.

“On Target”: Precision & Balance in the Contemporary Law of Targeting

“On Target”: Precision & Balance in the Contemporary Law of Targeting

Schmitt and Widmar explore the law of targeting within international humanitarian law (IHL) and its application to international and non-international armed conflict. The article examines the “five elements” of a target operation, including the target, the weapon used, the execution of the attack, possible collateral damage and incidental injury, and location of the strike. The […]

Of Guns & Grotius

Of Guns & Grotius

Kellman discusses the breakthroughs in the development of explosive weapons since the 13th century. He then analyzes the evolution of theories on the international law of war as expounded by Grotius, Gentili, and Vatel. He argues that these scholars should have instead developed an international law of peace; he hypothesizes what the foundation of law […]

Addressing the Guantanamo “Legacy Problem”: Bringing Law-of-War Prolonged Military Detention & Criminal Prosecution into Closer Alignment

Addressing the Guantanamo “Legacy Problem”: Bringing Law-of-War Prolonged Military Detention & Criminal Prosecution into Closer Alignment

Abrams seeks to move the discussion on Guantanamo detainees forward by bringing law-of-war detention and criminal prosecution into closer alignment. The article analyzes the Obama Administration’s current approach of dealing with terrorists captured abroad and its preference for conducting criminal prosecutions whenever feasible. Abrams proposes several changes to the current system, including a decision-making framework […]