Category Archives: Cybersecurity

“I have found Vol. 4:1 of the Journal of National Security Law & Policy, the Cybersecurity Symposium, to be an invaluable resource. I use many of these articles in my research and clinic preparation, and am glad to have a bound, hard copy that I can grab from my shelf and mark up as I like.” -Eric J. Lobsinger, Teaching Fellow, Georgetown University Law Center

Sony Hack

The 2014 Sony Hack and the Role of International Law

In this article, Clare Sullivan posits that the 2014 hack of Sony Pictures Entertainment (“Sony Hack”) heralds the arrival of a new form of modern warfare. She argues that the current state of international law is inadequate to deal with hacks like this one, which do not cause physical damage but which nonetheless result in serious economic harm and violations of privacy. In the author’s view, a new approach is needed to ensure that countries are permitted under international law to respond to and take countermeasures against such hacks.

cybercrime

Deterring Financially Motivated Cybercrime

In “Deterring Financially Motivated Cybercrime,” Zachary K. Goldman and Damon McCoy present three strategies for deterring attacks that use malicious cyber capabilities to generate a profit. Each strategy—the imposition of financial sanctions, public/private partnerships to disrupt tools of cybercrime, and activities to disrupt payment networks run by criminals who sell fraudulent goods over the Internet—is analyzed for strengths and weaknesses. The authors conclude with a discussion of the ways in which regulatory tools to combat cybercrime can overcome problems with formulating a cohesive deterrent strategy such as secrecy and attribution.

Cyberspace

Spying & Fighting in Cyberspace: What is Which?

Brown presents the nuances of cyberespionage versus cyberattacks that are becoming more pervasive in the national security context. He defines the differences between the two, and proposes a method of analyzing cyberspace operations to properly categorize them. Then, using an extended hypothetical and several real-life examples, Brown illustrates how dangerous cyber operations can be, and the need to properly define them so as to respond most effectively.

Spying and Fighting in Cyberspace