Tag Archives: Secrecy

national security

The Implications of Trying National Security Cases in Article III Courts

The Honorable Lewis A. Kaplan draws on his voluminous experience on the federal bench to illuminate some of the special concerns that attend terrorism and national security cases. Kaplan reviews several judicial challenges unique to terrorism cases, including classified information issues and the use of defendants’ statements in the course of prosecution. He concludes that Article III courts not only are capable of trying such cases, but they are the forum most consistent with our American values of fairness and transparency.

Can Technology Prevent Leaks?

Nathan Sales poses the question whether technology could have played a preventative role in the recent wave of security leaks. He first reviews the existing legal frameworks for adjudicating cases of criminal security leaks, and he finds only limited utility in these paradigms. He then proposes a technological supplement to these frameworks, an alternative he finds useful only for select categories of leaks.

The Wasp’s Nest: Intelligence Community Whistleblowing & Source Protection

Meyer and Berenbaum analyze the national security policy challenge in balancing protections for Intelligence Community whistleblowers and the government’s legitimate need for secrecy in order to execute the federal intelligence and counterintelligence mission. It is that need for secrecy that creates the intellectual distance between the sovereign’s requirement for information regarding the performance of the federal intelligence and counterintelligence mission and the ability to conduct that mission.