Tag Archives: Big Data

Domestic Surveillance

An Essay on Domestic Surveillance

In his essay on domestic surveillance, Philip Heymann explores the ways in which technological advancements have changed expectations of privacy and the legal protections against government intrusion. He outlines current constitutional and other legal protections, including evolving limitations on government activity that could be considered not a “search” under the Fourth Amendment. Heymann concludes with predictions about the future balance between citizens’ demands for privacy and the government need for information.

Fourth Amendment

Rethinking Privacy: Fourth Amendment “Papers” and the Third-Party Doctrine

As the field of privacy and digital surveillance grows increasingly chaotic, Michael Price proposes a compelling supplement to the third-party doctrine. Eschewing the popular position that our privacy clashes are generational, Price instead reviews the history of Fourth Amendment jurisprudence to identify missteps in doctrine that have led us to the current impossible position. Along the way he wrestles with problems such as cloud storage and communications metadata, and he concludes with a framework that strikes a new balance between our storied civil liberties heritage and the “papers” of a big data society.

The Wasp’s Nest: Intelligence Community Whistleblowing & Source Protection

Meyer and Berenbaum analyze the national security policy challenge in balancing protections for Intelligence Community whistleblowers and the government’s legitimate need for secrecy in order to execute the federal intelligence and counterintelligence mission. It is that need for secrecy that creates the intellectual distance between the sovereign’s requirement for information regarding the performance of the federal intelligence and counterintelligence mission and the ability to conduct that mission.