All posts by Ben T. Katsumi

Ben T. Katsumi is the Researcher IT Security Center, IPA & President and CEO, Information Economy Research Institute. Ben has 15 years of experience in cybersecurity specializing in marketing, market analysis, social and international studies, and security management and governance. His career includes 5 years at IPA as visiting researcher (2005 thru 2010), director at Symantec Japan (2001 thru 2004), consultant at several Japanese firms including Ricoh's affiliated company (2004 until now), sales and marketing manager at Nissin Electric. Ben is also active in Japan Network Security Association and Japan Information Security Audit Association. A member of Japan Society of Security Mangement and Institute of Digital Forensics. Bachelor digrees in Liberal Arts and Economy from Kyoto University in 1973 and 1975. CISA, ISMS provisional Auditor, Information Security Associate Auditor, Certified information Secuirty Administrator.

A Comparative Study of the Information Security Policies of Japan and the United States

This article describes the information security policies and institutions of the Japanese government and draws attention to comparable policies and institutions of the U.S. government. We begin with a discussion of Japan’s cybersecurity system. In Part II, we examine a particular type of information security policy, namely, cryptography policy, as a special example of how the different systems operate. Japan has implemented a cryptography policy that draws extensively on the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Cryptography Policy Guidelines. These guidelines are discussed to highlight issues that might emerge in the future in cryptography and merit attention at an international level. Part III analyzes anti-bot policy. Bots, an increasing concern on the Internet, break into an individual user’s PC and remotely control it. Bots pose a real problem for many nations, and there is clearly a need for multinational cooperation. This article concludes by suggesting that all involved parties must determine the appropriate extent of lawful access to communications. Moreover, cooperation in eliminating bots provides a good opportunity for Japan and the United States to lead an international effort.